History

Kibbutz Nir-Eliyahu is located to the northeast of Kfar-Saba, on the Sharon red soil hills, watching the western slopes of Samaria. The Kibbutz belongs to the Southern Sharon regional council.
On 27th of July, 1950 the first settlers pitched their tents. A group from Turkey with youth immigrants from Romania and Poland, which received training in the Kibbutzim Kfar-Giladi, Ein-Harod, Gal-Ed and Ashdot-Yaakov gathered for founding the kibbutz. The cause of settling in this location was the need to strengthen the rural population in the area and to block the border facing the Arab town of Qalqilia. The kibbutz fields extended to the outskirts of Qalqilia , a fact that led to damage of equipment, buildings and crops.
At the Six Day War, the kibbutz was damaged by shelling from Jordanian posts in Qalqilia (6/6/1967). On 2002, followed by the attacks of the intifada and by the paving of Highway 6 (cross Israel Highway), a security system and a 8 meter height wall were established to protect the road
  
Kibbutz Nir-Eliyahu belongs to the Kibbutz movement, and was named after Eliyahu Golomb, a senior commander of the Haganah in the struggle of the Jewish population against the British rule before the independence. Over the years of its existence the Kibbutz was joined by young groups from Mexico, South Africa and Israel
  • mary carmen hinterholzer

    For me it will always be the mosy beautiful place in earth…Ill always miss you and thank you for all what you gave me

  • משתמש אנונימי (לא מזוהה)

    I was a german volunteer an came twice to Nir Eliyahu in 1966. Joseph Kushmaro was at that time responsable for the german volunteers. I was harvesting oranges and peanuts and worked in the "Lul" vaccinating chicks. I loved it to eat with all the members in the great dining-hall. I had a great time in Nir Eliyahu, I learned a little bit hebrew and perhaps, somebody remembers me. Michael Dyllick, a blond german young men at that time

  • משתמש אנונימי (לא מזוהה)

    I was a Jewish voluteer from The USA in 1977. It was the dirtyist kibbutz I ever lived on. I encountered anti-american sentiment from an Israeli and most of the South Africans. Nobody made me feel accepted as a Jew. I will never go back there.

    • משתמש אנונימי (לא מזוהה)

      Weird – I don't think the Jewish Americans still living on the kibbutz who also came around that time seem to have the same impression….

      • Arye "Ha Shomen"

        I agree with you 100%. I too volunteered there. Felt very welcome. Enjoyed the work experience and the members were very kind.

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